Western Australia

Western Australia, Australia

westernaustraliapavilionstamp

Western Australia Day : 16 July 1988
Commissioner : Mr Len Hitchin
Pavilion : 731 square metres

One of the most memorable aspects of the W.A. pavilion was a 200 once gold-brick bar, worth some $AUD250, 000 from Western Australia’s famous gold fields.

The bar was ingeniously placed in a perspex triangular dome, with a small opening on the side large enough to put one hand in and lift it up – but not enough space to take it away with you!

You could also step on special scales to see the worth of your weight in gold – also popular – as well as view the impressive on-appointment-to-the-Crown Stuart Devlin Champagne Diamond Collection, of over 200 intricate works including a 10-carat champagne coloured diamond found and cut in Western Australia – the total collection worth some $AUD15 million dollars.

Displays of famous gold nuggets found in Western Australia also were on display – as well as a model of the revolutionary fuel and emissions efficient Sarich Orbital Engine.

Finally, at the Pavilion Gift Shop, one could buy the best of Western Australian handcrafts and produce from dried wildflowers to leather stockmen’s hats and precious jewellery.

References:
Report of the Commissioner-General of Expo 88 on the Australian Government’s Involvement in Expo ’88 (1988), Published by Office of the
Commissioner-General of World Expo ’88
World Expo ’88 – The Official Souvenir Program (1988), Editor Andrew Cowell, Published by Australian Consolidated Press
Expo! an independent Review (1988), Written by Scott Jones, David Bray, Juanita Phillips, Published by Boolarong Publications

Advertisements

Tasmania

Tasmania, Australia

tasmaniaoptimized

Tasmania Day : 12 September 1988
Agreement to Participate : 16 November 1987
Commissioner : Mr Roxley Jacklyn
Pavilion : Located in the Plaza

Tasmania’s representation at the Exposition was located in the colourful and popular ‘Plaza’ Pavilion – a host of several states and territories such as South Australia and the Northern Territory, as well as international and other corporations.

Under the theme ‘Tasmania – Naturally Different’, this tourist presentation of Australia’s “Apple Isle” welcomed guests through acut-out entrance of the apple-shaped island – and featured several displays of the island’s key industries from aerospace components to furniture making and fine wines to soft cheeses.

An interactive computer program where visitors could find out information about the State’s tourist attractions, accommodation and more also featured.

References:
Report of the Commissioner-General of Expo 88 on the Australian Government’s Involvement in Expo ’88 (1988), Published by Office of the
Commissioner-General of World Expo ’88
World Expo ’88 – The Official Souvenir Program (1988), Editor Andrew Cowell, Published by Australian Consolidated Press
Expo! an independent Review (1988), Written by Scott Jones, David Bray, Juanita Phillips, Published by Boolarong Publications

South Australia

South Australia, Australia

Image

South Australia Day : June 3, 1988
Agreement to Participate : 21 November 1987
Commissioner : Mr Ralph Moloney
Pavilion : Located in the Plaza

South Australia’s representation at the Exposition was located in the colourful and popular ‘Plaza’ Pavilion – a host of several states and territories as well as corporations.

With a model race car from the Adelaide Australia Formula 1 Gran Prix at the exhibit’s entrance, photograph displays from the “Visit South Australia” tourist campaign highlighted the varied attractions the State has to offer – as well as offering for sale some of the State’s fine wines – as well as dried fruit.

One corner of the exhibit also featured an interactive computer program that could assist guests wishing to invest in the state.

References:
Report of the Commissioner-General of Expo 88 on the Australian Government’s Involvement in Expo ’88 (1988), Published by Office of the Commissioner-General of World Expo ’88
World Expo ’88 – The Official Souvenir Program (1988), Editor Andrew Cowell, Published by Australian Consolidated Press
Expo! an independent Review (1988), Written by Scott Jones, David Bray, Juanita Phillips, Published by Boolarong Publications

Victoria

Victoria, Australia

Image

Image
One of John Underwood’s comic plaster-of-paris ‘Human Factor’ works climbs the ladder in front of the State of Victoria’s representation at World Expo ’88 : Image Courtesy and © Papermoon

Victoria Day : 14 October 1988
Agreement to Participate : 22 October 1987
Commissioner : Mr Neil Smith
Pavilion : 720 square metres

Victoria at World Expo ’88

 

Visitors queueing for the first time to the Victoria Pavilion were greeted by a piece of Expo history, with a stunning glass-enclosed ceramic peacock adorning the Pavilion entrance.

The peacock, now located in it’s home state of Victoria, and once located in the Melbourne Museum, was on it’s way from England in 1878 to take part in the British representation at the Inaugural Melbourne International Exhibition of 1880, Australia’s Second International Exhibition.

However, fate had other plans…..

The ship on which the peacock was placed ran into bad weather off the Victoria Australian coast, and never made it for the Melbourne Exhibition, after a complex salvage and legal enquiry.

Hidden at the bottom of the tumultuous waters of the Great Australian Bight, the wreck was difficult to find and salvage, with the latest discoveries occurring in the 1980s using the latest in scuba-diving technology. And, after passing through the hands of several owners, from the salvage company itself, to private ownership, and then ownership by Warrnambool City Council, as a generous effort by the Victorian State Government, represented Victoria at the Entrance to the Victorian State Pavilion at Brisbane’s World Expo ’88 – over a century after it’s planned exhibition for the Melbourne 1880 International Exhibition – a beautiful and inspiring epistle across time of the great Australian World Expositions.

ImageAs the Museum of Victoria relates:
“Another ship bringing exhibits from England, the Loch
Ard, also sunk on the way to Melbourne, off the western
coast of Victoria on 1 June 1878. The loss of forty-seven
lives made it one of Victoria’s worst shipwrecks. Much of
the cargo consisted of ceramics that Minton intended to
be part of their exhibit in the British pavilion. In particular,
a rare 153 cm high majolica peacock that was intended
to be the main exhibit, was lost. The peacock and other
Minton exhibits such as encaustic tiles have since been
recovered by archaeologists and are on display at the
Warrnambool Maritime Museum (Sotheby’s 1988;
Heritage Victoria Loch Ard Shipwreck file).”
The Loch Ard Minton Peacock

The peacock is now located at Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village, Warrnambool, a beautiful and historic port city, in Victoria, Australia, just 3.5 hours from the City of Melbourne.

Read the Exposé Interview focus special on the Loch Ard Peacock here (Photographs, Interview Summary, and Interview MP3 Recording).

The Pavilion itself featured seven mini-rooms – each highlighting a different facet of the Expo theme ‘Leisure in the Age of Technology’ – and ushered in groups of visitors 35 persons at a time.

After being greeted by a home robot of the ‘Jetson’s’ style – who takes a break from the daily ironing – one was led into a model of the human throat and lungs – emphasizing the importance of physical fitness in enjoying leisure. Images of Victoria’s major natural tourist attractions featured next – including wide-angle panorama views of the State’s major cities and towns. A mass of television monitors and computer displays made up the next mini-room, with a jigsaw puzzle-like three-dimensional world map embedded in the perspex floor rising to reveal first and foremost the State of Victoria, then the rest of Australia, and then the rest of the World.

The final presentations featured hi-tech displays of future communications networks – stocks & shares – and so on – music and technology – and lasers and holographs.

Also memorable was the Pavilion Wine Bar – where the State’s finest produce was available to enjoy and take with you.

References:
Image of the Ceramic Peacock, Loch Ard [CeramicPeacockLochArd.jpg], as found in Ahoy – Mac’s Web Log ‘Clipper Ship Loch Ard, a victim of the Shipwreck Coast in 1878’, http://ahoy.tk-jk.net/macslog/ClipperShipLochArd.html (date of access 17 November 2005)
Report of the Commissioner-General of Expo 88 on the Australian Government’s Involvement in Expo ’88 (1988), Published by Office of the Commissioner-General of World Expo ’88
World Expo ’88 – The Official Souvenir Program (1988), Editor Andrew Cowell, Published by Australian Consolidated Press
Expo! an independent Review (1988), Written by Scott Jones, David Bray, Juanita Phillips, Published by Boolarong Publications

 

Australian Capital Territory

Image

 

Australian Capital Territory, Australia
Canberra Day : September 11, 1988
Agreement to Participate : 3 March 1988
Commissioner : Mr Fulton Muir
Pavilion : 275 square metres

The A.C.T., being one of the last Australian Governments to confirm representation at the World Exposition, had to be relegated far away from the flag-ship Australian Pavilion and other states, and was placed at the very eastern part of the Expo site, bordered by Nepal and Kenya.

 

Being the year that the monumental new Australian Parliament House was to be completed in Canberra, the ceiling of the pavilion quite memorably was adorned by a life-size replica of the enormous 12m x 6m Australian Flag that was to grace the top of the ‘flag-pole’ above the centre of the new Parliament House building.

 

Visitors to the Pavilion could also view a theatrette audio-visual on the new building, as well as a scale model.

 

Highlight of the Pavilion was the brilliant and controversial work by Jackson Pollock, ‘Blue Poles’, on special loan from the National Art Gallery.

 

The new Parliament House was opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in May, 1988.

 

The controversial “Blue Poles”, on loan from the National Gallery of Australia Maps and images of the design of Canberra also featured.

ImageImage

Image
Some images from the Australian Capital Territory Pavilion
[R] Pavilion Entrance, featuring the iconic flag-pole top of the new Australian Parliament
[M] Early designs of Canberra and the new Parliament House
[L] The brilliant and controversial ‘Blue Poles’ by Jackson Pollock, on loan from the National Art Gallery
Images Courtesy of Damian McGreevy
Front of the Australian Capital Territory Pavilion, World Expo ’88 – featuring the symbolic new Parliament House structure

 

References:
Report of the Commissioner-General of Expo 88 on the Australian Government’s Involvement in Expo ’88 (1988), Published by Office of the
Commissioner-General of World Expo ’88
The McGreevy Collection
World Expo ’88 – The Official Souvenir Program (1988), Editor Andrew Cowell, Published by Australian Consolidated Press
Expo! an independent Review (1988), Written by Scott Jones, David Bray, Juanita Phillips, Published by Boolarong Publications

 

 

 

 

 

New South Wales

New South Wales, Australia

NSW Day : July 13, 1988
Agreement to Participate : 2 October 1987
Commissioner : Mr Alan Marsh
Pavilion : 727 square metres

New South Wales at World Expo ’88

Image
Pavilion Attendants in ‘convict’ and period costumes await visitors to the New South Wales Pavilion at World Expo ’88 : Image Courtesy and © Papermoon

New South Wales, the first British settlement of Australia, presented it’s maritime convict beginnings and it’s development into one of Australia’s leading states in an imaginative multi-themed theatre-style and audio-visual display.

Located near the Australia and Queensland Pavilions, and just to the side of the Expo icon Tower ‘Night Companion’ – Pavilion staff in themed uniforms of the time of settlement – some in comic-like convict-garb, and others of free-setllers – welcomed visitors against a painted backdrop reminiscent of the tall ships that first visited the land – to the sailing ships that play on Sydney Harbour today.

The two major presentations, with the first featuring a reproduction of a 1780s English dockside and the First Fleet ship HMS Sirius about to sail for her destination – replete with old worlde charm, swaying floors, background sea-sound noise, and an artificial sea-fog to replicate a ‘sea-voyage’ feel – became the setting for viewing an audio-visual presentation of Sydney from 1788 to 1988.

The second part of the Pavilion featured a Showscan 70mm film presentation projected on a wall-to-wall floor-to-ceiling screen, showcasing the diverse picturesque landscape of the State today – from a helicopter ride to the NSW outback, a wild boat race, high-speed skiing and waterskiing.

There was also a Pavilion Shop selling Australian souvenirs.

References:
Report of the Commissioner-General of Expo 88 on the Australian Government’s Involvement in Expo ’88 (1988), Published by Office of the
Commissioner-General of World Expo ’88
World Expo ’88 – The Official Souvenir Program (1988), Editor Andrew Cowell, Published by Australian Consolidated Press
Expo! an independent Review (1988), Written by Scott Jones, David Bray, Juanita Phillips, Published by Boolarong Publications

The Queensland Pavilion

Image

 

Queensland, Australia
Queensland Day : June 6, 1988
Agreement to participate : 20 May 1985
Commissioner : Mr Fred Maybury
Pavilion : 4400 square metres

The Queensland Pavilion

 

Image
Street performers with the Queensland Pavilion at World Expo ’88: Image Courtesy of the Gabriel Collection

The curved Pavilion façade featured a variety of images pertaining to the State – which revolved in tandem every few minutes. The image shown here is of the Flag of the State.

The Queensland Pavilion, being the more than equal partner with Australia of the task of ‘flagship pavilion,’ wowed the crowds with it’s themed-ride through outback, urban and rainforest Queensland, and undoubtedly was one of the most popular and most visited pavilions on the expo site.

Visitors were asked to enter specially designed transport pods which carried people 50-a-time through the pavilion in air-conditioned comfort, and were told the story of this modern and proud state, via eight themed diorama theatrettes – most memorably including a visit to a corrugated-tin roofed verandah of a Queensland ‘outback’ pub, where mannequin bush narrators with ‘talking’ television heads humourously shared anecdotes about life in the ‘sunshine state’; a journey amongst the rich green foliage of a north tropical rainforest where animatronic sulfur-crested cockatoos joined in the debate and rainforest snakes hissed at surprised passersby; and finally, a view of the globe and state from an inter-planetary space station, where Queensland’s ambitions for the space race in the proposed Cape York International Space Port, in the State’s deep north, were noted – then transporting one back to 1988 Expo Queensland, just in time to purchase unique Queensland souvenirs from the Pavilion’s ‘Sunmap’ Shop.

The $AUD 16 million dollar Pavilion also looked over the River Stage, and featured a white curved exterior, featuring the “Join the Spirit” logo of the Pavilion (as noted below), and a rotating information board of images of the more familiar symbols of State – flora and fauna – as well as the State Flag (as noted above). The popular Pavilion theme song ‘Come, Join the Spirit!’, was composed by famous locals Frank Millward and Carol Lloyd – who also composed the official theme song of World Expo ’88 – ‘Together, We’ll Show the World.”

The Pavilion is also well remembered for it’s faux multi-level tropical rainforest foyer, which hosted the Expo Monorail.

.Image

Image

Technical Details Fact Sheet – Official Queensland Pavilion World Expo 88 Pamphlet

 

 

References:
Report of the Commissioner-General of Expo 88 on the Australian Government’s Involvement in Expo ’88 (1988), Published by Office of the
Commissioner-General of World Expo ’88
Showing Off: Queensland at World Expositions 1862-1988 (2004), Author Dr Judith McKay, Published by Central Queensland University Press and the
Queensland Museum
Queensland: Share the Spirit! Official Pavilion Pamphlet
The Gabriel Collection
World Expo ’88 – The Official Souvenir Program (1988), Editor Andrew Cowell, Published by Australian Consolidated Press
Expo! an independent Review (1988), Written by Scott Jones, David Bray, Juanita Phillips, Published by Boolarong Publications

 

The Australia Pavilion

ImageImage

Australia
National Day : June 18, 1988
Agreement to participate : 11 August 1984
Commissioner-General : Mr Tom Veivers
Pavilion : 4848 square metres
Return to Table of Contents

The Australia Pavilion at World Expo ’88

Image

 

[Brisbane City Council Image 2BCC-T120-1294-1 Courtesy and Copyright Brisbane City Council]

The Australia Pavilion, with it’s bright ‘AUSTRALIA’ letters at each Exit and Entrance, and location just in front of the Expo’s most popular day and night rendezvous – the 88-metre high symbol tower and light-beacon of the Exposition – ‘Night Companion’ – was one of the most striking and memorable Pavilions of the Expo site – popularly voted as one of the ‘Top 5’ Pavilions at the Expo – and at $AUD 18 million – the Expo’s largest Pavilion.

The roof of the Pavilion, easily recognizable from afar, was designed to closely follow the contours and the many brilliant sunrise/sunset colours of one of Australia’s most famous icons – Uluru – Ayers Rock. The imaginatively designed contoured roof also provided VIP seating for the nightly entertainment at the Exposition’s large performance venue – the ‘River Stage’ – located at the Pavilion’s eastern flank – giving Pavilion and Expo Authority VIPs the ‘best seats of the house’ for theatre, music, and the popular nightly music, laser and fireworks displays.

The two sets of AUSTRALIA letters commissioned for the Australia Pavilion at Expo – fondly remembered as one of the outstanding icons of World Expo ’88 – were one of the most photographed art works at the Expo – where proud Bicentennial Australians – and visitors – queued to have their photograph taken with them. At some 2 metres high per letter – in vertically ‘stacked’ groups of three letters at the Entrance to the Pavilion, and in a long single line of letters at the VIP Entrance/Pavilion Exit – much larger – at 5.3 metres high per letter, the themed letters were designed by internationally-renowned Australian artist/designer Mr Ken Done, and in their bright rendition of the Australian sun, indigenous Australia, tropical palms and the Southern Cross, represented a new proud Australia at the height of the Bicentennial Celebrations.

And this was just the start. Inside the Pavilion guests engaged with the millenia-old stories of the Australian Aboriginal Dreamtime in the Rainbow Serpent Theatre – using spectacular traditional theatre and multimedia display technology – where the legend of the Rainbow Serpent was narrated to the theatrette audience by an Australian Aboriginal Elder, from the midst of an imaginary Australian outback red earth desert camp fire, with an Australian night sky in the background.

The next part of the Pavilion featured the Rainbow Sphere – an ever-changing luminescent kaleidoscope, prettily echoing the colours of modern day country and urban Australia – where above and nearby various static displays of aeronautics, sailing craft and solar-powered vehicles, and a humourous 3-metre high sports robot ‘Blue’ randomly gave out statistics about Australian leisure.

The Australia Pavilion is also remembered for the cordial friendly pavilion staff, sourced from all over Australia, whose bright colourful uniforms, designed by leading Australian Fashion designer Prue Acton, further developed the Pavilion’s Ken Done AUSTRALIA letters theme.

Visit the Foundation Expo ’88 Proposal to bring the Australia Letters back to South Bank Parklands – the former Expo site – for the 20th Anniversary of Expo in 2008
Visit the Ken Done website
Visit the Prue Acton Website
Visit the Powerhouse Museum Sydney listing for Ken Done
Visit the Australian Government website

Technical Details Fact Sheet

– Pavilion Architect: Ken Woolley (Sydney). Visit the Ancher/Mortlock/Woolley website.
– The Rainbow Serpent Theatre
Commissioned and funded by the Australian Commonwealth Government. Managed by the Office of the Commissioner-General, Australia Pavilion, World Expo ’88, in association with the Department of the Arts, Sport, the Environment, Tourism, and Territories; with assistance from the
Department of Administrative Services (Construction Group), and the Department of Aboriginal Affairs.

Executive Producers: ‘The Production Group’
Executive Producer – Ann Derham
Project Director – Tim McMahon (now “thinkOTS!”, Designers for the Australia Pavilion at Aichi World Expo 2005 Japan. Visit the thinkOTS! website.)
Scriptwriters – Oodgeroo Noonuccal (formerly Kath Walker), Artistic Adviser to the Aboriginal National Theatre Trust; Kabul Oodgeroo Noonuccal, (formerly Vivan Walker) Artistic Adviser to the Aboriginal National Theatre Trust.

References:
Report of the Commissioner-General of Expo 88 on the Australian Government’s Involvement in Expo ’88 (1988), Published by Office of the
Commissioner-General of World Expo ’88
Brisbane Images, Brisbane City Council Libraries, http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/uhtbin/webcat/
World Expo ’88 – The Official Souvenir Program (1988), Editor Andrew Cowell, Published by Australian Consolidated Press
Expo! an independent Review (1988), Written by Scott Jones, David Bray, Juanita Phillips, Published by Boolarong Publications
The Rainbow Serpent (1988), Oodgeroo Noonuccal and Kabul Oodegeroo Noonuccal, Published by Australian Government Publishing Service

About Brisbane

Brisbane is a sub-tropical city located in the south-east corner of the State of Queensland, which is a member of the Commonwealth of Australia.

It is the capital of Queensland, and has a population of approximately 1.6 million persons, making it the third largest city in Australia, after Sydney, and Melbourne. From an area point of view, it is one of the largest cities in the world.

Long regarded as the ‘deep and un-developed north’ by it’s southern and more prosperous state neighbours, after landmark events such as the XIIth Commonwealth Games in 1982 and World Expo ’88 in 1988 – the largest event in Australia’s bi-centennial year – it is today regarded one of the most livable cities in the Asia-Pacific region, and has one of the highest rates of migration to the city from other states.

Life in Brisbane is characterized by it’s iconic stilt houses, lazy summer days where the temperature doesn’t drop below 25 degrees, the beautiful purples of it’s wild bouganvilleas and jacaranda trees, as well as quick ‘get-aways’ to the beach meccas of the Sunshine and Gold Coasts, to the north and south of the city respectively.

Brisbane’s official internet portal is http://www.ourbrisbane.com.
Visit Brisbane today!

Population Statistics Courtesy of
Australian Bureau of Statistics Brisbane Page (2001)
Portal Entrance Page http://www.abs.gov.au

The World Expo 88 Heritage Trail

brisbanemapbywilmap

 

The World Expo ’88 Heritage Trail and the Brisbane World Expo ’88 Network Guide Pamphlet are two initiatives of Foundation Expo ’88 that celebrate our rich World Expositions heritage.

Do a ‘virtual visit’ of the Trail’s path and hyperlinks today – and download the Network Guide Pamphlet – you’ll get the chance to whet your appetite for your visit to Brisbane City to follow the Trail/Guide in person – and you’ll also get to view and visit some of the City’s excellent cultural infrastructure – many of which are also for free!
Walk Part 1 – Works 1,2,3,4

1. Gidon Graetz “Mirage”
Inside Brisbane Arcade, Queen Street Mall
* Enjoy this beautifully restored Art Deco arcade

2. Arnaldo Pomodoro “Forme del Mito”
Brisbane City Hall King George Square
* Also pay a visit to the new Museum of Brisbane, inside City Hall. Admission is Free.

3. Baile Oakes “Gestation”
Roma Street Forum
* This space is popular for social justice rallies and marches.

Walk through Roma Street Railway Station to the new Roma Street Parklands and the next work, at the northern most tip of the Park. At the platforms entrance to Roma Street Station, pick up automatic station platform ticket (free) – and continue to walk through the Station until you reach the last Exit – on the left. Exit the Station, cross Taxi Rank, and walk towards Park escalators, at top turn 180 deg and you will soon see the Parkland Cafe ‘melangè’. If you are doing the Full Day Walk, this is the time to have a meal-stop and break! Continue walking straight ahead till the end of the Park, and you will soon see the Park Exit and Carpark. You are nearly there.

4. Greg Johns “Continuous Division”
Roma Street Parklands Visitors Carpark

Option [End Walk 1]: End walk here, return to the Park Entrance and have a bite to eat and drink at the popular ‘melangè’ cafe. Their raisun fruit bread and coffee is highly recommended! This will then return you to the centre of the City and work number 1. Start the second part of the walk – from work number 5 – on another day!
Option [Full Day Walk]: Continue from work number 4 and re-enter the Roma Street Parklands – walking up to the upper left end of the park and you will exit on College Road. Turn left noting the Victorian architecture of Brisbane Grammar School up on your right, then continue walking left till you arrive at Countess Street at the next intersection. Turn left again down Countess Street until you arrive at the Grey Street (or William Jolly) Bridge. Cross the Bridge to South Brisbane, passing by the famous Dinosaur Garden (free to enter and browse) entrance to the Queensland Museum.

The Museum is part of the award-winning Queensland Cultural Centre designed by renowned Brisbane architect Robin Gibson featuring the State Library, Museum, Art Gallery and the Queensland Performing Arts Complex (known as QPAC) – containing the 2000-seat Lyric Theatre, 1850-seat Concert Hall, 850-seat Playhouse, and the 312-seat Cremorne Theatre. The site will also soon play host to the new ‘Queensland Gallery of Modern Art’, which is presently under construction and part of the Queensland Government’s ‘Millennium Arts Project’.

With the exception of special exhibitions, entrance to the State Library, Queensland Museum and Art Gallery is free.

Turn right into Melbourne Street – in the distance you should be able to see the next work – the Stefan Skyneedle. Continue walking until you arrive at the corner of Manning Street and Melbourne Street. The base of the Skyneedle can be viewed from the street. There is an Italian Pasta/Coffee/and Cake shop just near across the road from the intersection of Manning and Melbourne Streets – duck in here for some ‘worth enough to travel to Italy’ for – Tiramisu – and freshly brewed coffee.
Walk Part 2 – Works 5,6,7,8

5. Robert Owen/Charles Sutherland “Night Companion” (can be seen from a distance)
Now known as the ‘Stefan Sky Needle’ – the footprint of this work is located in the car park of the Stefan Hairdressing Empire H.Q., at the corners of Melbourne and Manning Street, West End. The car park is closed to the general public – if you wish to observe this work close at hand, an excellent view of the base of the structure is available from the street. The work is slightly raised higher here than it’s height at Expo.

Facing the City, walk to the right along Melbourne Street until you pass by the new Cultural Centre BusWay station. Turn right and walk along the SouthBank Parklands Entrance Forecourt, turn towards the riverside, and continue walking along the riverside Boulevard. Soon on your immediate right you will see the next work – the Nepalese Peace Pagoda.

6. The Nepalese Peace Pagoda (only remaining Pavilion from World Expo ’88 at South Bank)
South Bank Parklands

You are now in the former Exposition precinct. Walk along the new South Bank Boulevard, stopping for a swim at the salt-water artificial beach – it’s fun!

Keep walking along the ‘Energex Arbour Boulevard’ – with it’s wonderful signature mauve bouganvillea vines and steel tendrils – past the entrance to the Goodwill Bridge, and follow the path along the riverside for the next few hundred metres. You will see the next group of primary-coloured artworks, in steel, playfully arching into the river, footpath and stairwells.

7. Peter D. Cole “Man & Matter”
Various works along the Kangaroo Point City Boardwalk

Walk back towards the new Goodwill Bridge from the Maritime Museum to the Botanic Gardens. Walk through the Queensland University of Technology campus to the State Parliament of Queensland (a lovely building in itself – constructed in 1868), enter the Botanic Gardens from the Parliament House entrance – the next work is in front of you on the right.

8. Jon Barlow Hudson “Morning Star II”
Brisbane City Botanic Gardens
* Enjoy this last work in the tranquility of the Botanic Gardens. Follow the signs to the Café for a cool drink.
Please Note: Walk 1 (works 1,2,3,4) will take about 3 hours, at a fairly sedentary pace, and also includes some up-hill walking – only persons of reasonable fitness level should attempt it. Walk 2 (works 5, 6, 7, 8) will also take approximately 3 hours. Why not do one walk one weekend – the other another day? And, don’t forget to do the Queensland ‘slip, slop, slap’ – slip on a shirt, slop on sunscreen and slap on a hat – and BYO water!

Things to Do
Each work has a commemorative plaque stating it’s role in World Expo ’88 – bend over and take a closer look!,

Have a break by visiting some of the cultural venues along the way!

And don’t forget to ask someone for directions if needed!

Admission to the majority of cultural venues noted on this trail is FREE
Please ring in advance if you wish to take part in a tour
Foundation Expo ’88 gives no warranty in relation to the data (including accuracy, reliability, completeness or suitability) and accepts no liability (including without limitation, liability in negligence) for any loss, damage or costs (including consequential damage) relating to any use of the data.